Robert Kuttner

Robert Kuttner is co-founder and co-editor of The American Prospect, and professor at Brandeis University's Heller School. His latest book is Debtors' Prison: The Politics of Austerity Versus Possibility. He writes columns for The Huffington Post, The Boston Globe and the New York Times international edition. 

Recent Articles

Deceptively Dangerous

How does George W. Bush get away with it? His trademark is the use of liberal-sounding rhetoric -- on health care, education, jobs, tax fairness, the environment -- while his policies do the opposite. To watch his recent address on Medicare and Medicaid (which he wants to gut), you would think you were listening to Sen. Ted Kennedy (D-Mass.). Presumably, Bush resorts to liberal rhetoric because these are the policies the country wants. Don't the voters care when he does the opposite? Bush's march to war has also been marked by one misrepresentation after another. Seymour Hersh, writing in The New Yorker , recently exposed as a forgery the administration's claim that Saddam Hussein was seeking to buy enriched uranium for nuclear weapons. The war is not the cakewalk Bush forecast. Ordinary Iraqis are not greeting American troops with flowers, while U.S. casualties mount. The recriminations -- generals versus Rumsfeld, Pentagon versus State Department -- are already leaking into the...

Offensive Interference

The war in Iraq might not be going quite as smoothly as the Bush administration hoped, but the war at home is going just swimmingly. War is silencing debate not just on the wisdom of Bush's foreign policy but on a host of other issues that would normally be front-page news. You might have missed it, but this is budget season. Thanks to the distractions of war, bizarre budget resolutions are swiftly moving through Congress and will be law by mid-April. For the first time ever in the United States, we are rushing through an immense tax cut in the midst of a war that the president admits will cost at least $74.7 billion just in its first phase. The consequence of this, not surprisingly, is massive cuts in popular outlays. The budget enacted by the Republican House on a straight-line party vote (with just 12 GOP dissenters) is astonishing. It not only gives Bush his entire tax cut but proposes to balance the budget within six years. The casualties of that process would be monumentally...

Two Movements

What does an antiwar movement do with a war likely to be over in a matter of weeks? Plenty, it turns out. The antiwar movement is actually two rather different movements that partly overlap. One movement is in the streets and on the internet -- often led by radicals, sometimes joined uneasily by liberals. The other is pragmatic and mainstream. Both were nonplussed but only temporarily by the outbreak of war, and neither has gone away. The radical antiwar movement opposes war in general and particularly resists the projection of American military and corporate power globally. A minority of this minority, like the group International A.N.S.W.E.R., can fairly be described as Marxist. Many others, with varying degrees of pacifism, simply reject Bush administration plans for global dominion. It was this wing of the antiwar movement that organized the stunning demonstrations three weekends ago, the largest in the history of the world. A great many ordinary non-radicals also joined in,...

Blair Ditch

One likely piece of collateral damage from President Bush's Iraq campaign could be British Prime Minister Tony Blair. Seldom has a U.S. president had a more loyal -- some would say spaniel-like -- ally, and seldom has such an ally been treated more like a dog. Tuesday night, Blair won a fiercely contested vote in the House of Commons supporting British participation in the war without UN endorsement. It was Blair who compelled George W. Bush to go before the UN Security Council last fall. Blair could never have sold an invasion of Iraq to British public opinion without the United Nations, and this was Blair's condition for supporting Bush. Now, however, Bush has entirely stiffed his ally. At the hastily called Azores summit, Blair pressed Bush for more time, for assurances that the occupation of Iraq would be a UN, rather than a US operation, and for a resurrection of the Israel-Palestine peace process. Of these, Bush gave symbolic ground only on the third item, with a promise to...

Eleventh Hour

To view a PDF copy of the religious leaders' advertisement -- which appeared in major British newspapers today -- click here . With war looming, the one man who might possibly cause George W. Bush to modify his course of action is British Prime Minister Tony Blair. It was Blair, you might remember, who persuaded Bush to go to the United Nations last fall. Yet by deciding to invade Iraq without the UN's blessing, Bush has savagely undercut Blair's domestic fortunes. The prime minister's well-respected Labour Party leader in the House of Commons, former Foreign Secretary Robin Cook, resigned yesterday. Two other cabinet ministers resigned last night. Yet another minister, Clare Short, who holds the international development portfolio, has threatened to resign. Short has been working with international religious leaders, many of them American, to try to enlist Blair to support an alternative. Tonight, the House of Commons debates a crucial resolution authorizing British military...

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